Choose speciality channel:   Choose sector channel:     Search the site

News

 

Twitter makes it easier to follow your followers

Twitter makes it easier to follow your followers

One of the biggest annoyances from Twitter users is that once a user has passed a certain number of followers, the stream of tweets is impossible to keep up with. But this is about to change, as the micro-blogging site introduces a new ‘Lists’ feature.  

The List sharing feature will open up a lot of possibilities for list curators to emerge on the service, creating a whole new class of influential users.

This should help with the discovery of new Twitter accounts and hopefully help to keep fresh content flowing to you.

For example, you can create a list of all of your work friends or one for all of your drinking buddies. By default, lists are public (although private ones can be created), so they can be shared with anyone on Twitter. Other users can then subscribe directly to one of your public lists if they are interested.

By giving users the ability to group people together, it becomes a lot easier to keep track of the accounts that you are interested in at a given time. This will certainly allow people to use the service much more effectively.

Lists has been one of the most requested features for Twitter for some time. Twitter has said that information on how Lists will work in their API will come in a few days.

Meanwhile, new research from an American university has shown that Twitterers mainly use the network to talk about themselves. Only 20% of users are "informers" who use Twitter to post informational updates, such as links, news, and articles.

A study of 3000 Tweets from 350 users found that 80% of users are "meformers," or "Me Now" status updaters.

According to the researchers, these "meformers" use Twitter to "post updates on their everyday activities, social lives, feelings, thoughts, and emotions."

"Meformers" were found to have fewer friends and followers than informers. Mashable writes,

The median informer has 131 friends and 112 followers, while the median meformer has just 61 friends and 43 followers.

The study also found that 40% of Tweets are "all about me" personal updates.

The "meformers" may seem self-centered, but the research concluded that's not necessarily a bad thing in the world of online social media.

Although the meformers' self-focus might be characterized by some as self-indulgent, these messages may play an important role in helping users maintain relationships with strong and weak ties, according to the report.  

AJR


Check out 12ahead, our brand new platform covering the latest in cutting-edge digital marketing and creative technology from around the globe.

12ahead identifies emerging trends and helps you to understand how they can apply to modern-day companies.

We believe 12ahead can put you and your business 12 months ahead of the competition. Sign up for a free trial today.