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How to be more employable

How to be more employable

Where do you want to be in five or 10 years time? Have you got your career mapped out?

If you’re with a company or in an industry sector you intend in specialising in, or hope to climb the ladder with, then it might be wise to stay put.

If you’re not where you plan to be, or not even sure where you want to be, then perhaps it’s time to think about changing industries.

So why should you change industry sector?

Being able to demonstrate you have worked in different industries will make you more employable to a whole spectrum of different companies.

We’re not advocating you change sector every six months. That would just make you look flighty. But an occasional change could be of benefit to your career.

Head of Integrated Recruitment at Major Players, Richard Maddox, told us, “A CV with multi-sector experience demonstrates transferable skills.

“As long as the 'previous' sector experience is in-depth and not too out-of-touch with the marketplace, you should not get pigeonholed in the most recent sector you have worked in.

He added, “CVs with two or three sector experiences are especially valued if the brands or projects are recognised.”

It may not be as difficult as your think.

During her career, current publisher of Nuts and Head of Marketing for Nuts and Loaded magazines, Clair Porteous has moved from marketing in radio, to online to magazines.

She told us, “Good marketing is good marketing. If you can demonstrate you have grasped the fundamentals – call to action, understanding your consumer and insight from research then there’s no reason why you can’t change industries.

“What’s amazed me most is how different sectors perceive the role of marketing and what’s involved.”

To impress an employer from an industry sector, different to the one you are currently working in, Clair adds you should be able to demonstrate how to position a product and how a campaign you have managed has delivered.

She also recommends you show a cultural fit with knowledge of the industry and it’s target market.

Clair said, “As a marketer everything is about objectives and meeting them. Those objectives are ultimately driven by the business.

“Being able to show understanding of an audience and demonstrate the effectiveness of a campaign for a company, there’s no reason why that shouldn’t be applicable to another.”

What marketing skills should you be looking to acquire to change sector?

According to MD of, Simon Dawson, when you’re thinking about moving out of a pigeonhole, the greatest problem is to convince someone you can be a different bird. But it is achievable.

He said, “If you understand the skills you have that are transferable between different jobs, then you are almost home and dry. Transferable skills are those things in the background that support what you do at the moment.”

Simon categorises these into three main types.

1. People Skills

Can you motivate others ?  Can you influence ? What about being able to calm a situation. Co-ordinating people is a great strength. Leading others is always a great asset. 

He adds, “Before we go further, there is a real big danger to avoid. If you think you can answer these questions yourself, you are probably wrong. Try asking others whether you have these skills, or better still, ask them what they think you really contribute."

2. Is information your bag?

Can you analyse well? Can you synthesise? What about clear communication? Can you organise brilliantly?  Is your judgement awesome?

3. Or are you a things person?

Can you grow something? Develop it to something new? Have you a gift for design? What about being truly creative. Do you deeply care about the things you do?

Head of Integrated Recruitment at Major Players, Richard Maddox, added, “Skills such as project management, client servicing, people management and budget control alongside clear achievements in the role are always in demand.

“Certain sectors such as financial services will require specialist knowledge of the sector, but less specifically demanding sectors may look at, say, an FMCG experience and see transferable skills.

How can you best present your skills and make them relatable to an employer from another sector?

For starters, get your CV right.  According to Richard Maddox, how a CV looks to a potential employer will depend on the depth of experience you can show within the sectors, the brands you have worked on and how recent that experience was gained.

He concludes, “For specialist sectors such as Financial Services, FMCG and Telecommunications, in-depth experience on recognisable brands or projects will impress across other sectors.

“For less recognisable brands or less in-depth experience your CV needs to clearly communicate the transferable skills such as project management, client servicing, people management and budget control/ROI.”

To make that next move check out our career and jobs section

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